23 People Who Will Make You Care About Poetry in 2013

23 People Who Will Make You Care About Poetry in 2013

Flavorwire

It isn’t far-fetched to say that Patricia Lockwood’s poem “Rape Joke,” which was published at The Awl this week, was the best thing most people read on the Internet, and quite possibly the brightest moment for poetry, this entire year. Very rarely in this day and age do you see people discussing and sharing a poem the way the Internet has with “Rape Joke,” and the sheer number of times this harrowing work has been shared (23,710 times as of this writing, on Facebook alone) lays to waste the ignorant claim that poetry is dead. While Lockwood, who is the author of the poetry collection Balloon Pop Outlaw Black, might be the most talked about poet right now, she certainly isn’t the only person keeping poetry relevant in 2013. Here are some more names to know.

View original post 666 more words

50 Essential Books of Poetry That Everyone Should Read

50 poetry books

Flavorwire

It’s National Poetry Month, and you’re probably thinking: “I should really read more poetry. But where oh where do I start?” Well, sound the trumpets, because here is Flavorwire to the rescue! After the jump, you’ll find a list of 50 essential books of poetry that pretty much everyone should read. There’s something for everybody here, from the deeply established canonical works to riveting, important books by newer poets, from the Romantics to the post-modernists, from the goofy to the staid. NB: as with other lists like these, only one work per author has been included, and there is a bias against the “Collected Poems of” unless necessary. Obviously, inevitably, painfully, there are many, many poets and works of poetry, both of great renown and less so, that are missing here and should still be read by everyone. This list can only reflect personal taste, chance meetings, and wild subjectivity…

View original post 2,183 more words

10 Albums and Books That Make a Perfect Fit

Consequence of Sound

Soundtracking Life, a new monthly feature created by Lior Phillips and co-developed with Matt Melis, aims to pair everyday life with the music that underscores, speaks to, and enhances our experiences. This month, the CoS Staff soundtracks 10 of our favorite books.

There is a long-held belief about books: they’re silent by design and singular in experience. Unleashed by the authors’ words, you are able to run with their voice and expose yourself completely—as if dragged into a state of emotive groupthink you can’t possibly kick out of. Every so often, a book can get right under your skin, just like music, and you’re left feeling auxiliary yet completely submerged.

To put a human myth mildly, Blaise Pascal shook his fist reminding us that “the sole cause of man’s unhappiness is that he does not know how to stay quietly in his room.” Unfortunately, reality is slightly grayer than that…

View original post 2,867 more words

50 Things You Didn’t Know About Jackson Pollock

Flavorwire

Jackson Pollock took an unconventional approach to painting unconventional pictures. He preferred laying his canvas on the floor instead of setting it on an easel, and rarely touched it with his brush — that is, whenever he happened to use a brush, which wasn’t often. Instead, Pollock would drip paint from knives or sticks or other such objects while he frantically moved around the canvas trying to create the right combination of color, pattern, and texture. With this defiant attitude, Pollock helped define the genre of Abstract Expressionism and make New York City the art capital of the world.

Plagued by alcoholism, Pollock’s life ended at the age of 44 when he crashed his car into a tree just one mile away from his home. He had been drinking that night, and it would prove to be his last. Today is Pollock’s birthday, so to celebrate a life lived instead…

View original post 1,214 more words

Darko Cvijetić: Mali esej

radio gornji grad

420263_286416854765190_100001906324519_717020_211874863_n

Mali eseji

(Za Tamaru Kaliternu)

MUHE OKO OPEKOTINE

“I tko će dati novorođenče svoje

za pseto ispred smrzlih vrata”

W.Blake

W.Blake jest onaj kojeg na tenku

recitira mladić koji je prije sat

vremena strijeljao dvoje staraca,

nakon pogibije frenda. Na suđenju

u haškom tribunalu, uporno je

tvrdio da je recitirao Audena,

moguće i Frosta, kazao je, nikako

Blakea.

SVE TROJE STE MI NA SISI ĆAPĆALI

Ulica u Boriku, u Banjoj Luci, nosila

je prije rata ime Skendera Kulenovića.

U ratu su naziv ulice promijenili

u – Majke Knežopoljke.

Tako je junakinja poeme

pojela poemopisca.

Danas se ulica zove Mrđanova.

ROMAN O ODGAĐANJIMA

Miloš je Crnjanski 1926. u okolici

Vršca imao dvoboj pištoljima s

izvjesnim pilotom Tadijom

Sondermajerom. Sekundanti i

svjedoci su mu bili Dušan Matić i

Branko Gavella.Dvoboj je

isprovocirao Crnjanski nakon

svađe s grupom pilota.Pucao je

prvi i promašio.Sondermajer je

podigao pištolj, zatim uzviknuo –

Je renonce (odustajem)! –…

View original post 206 more words

Emotional Photos of People’s Insecurities Revealed

Flavorwire

The Internet has become a collective confessional, in which people share their deepest secrets, desires, and sometimes, their regrets. One artist, who we first discovered on Lost at E Minor, hopes to use it as a platform for social change. “In today’s society, we are often told to look or act a certain way. If we differ from these ‘standards,’ we are often judged, ridiculed, bullied and sometimes even killed over them,” photographer Steve Rosenfield wrote of his What I Be photo series. “I started this project in hopes to open up the lines of communication, and to help everyone accept diversity with an open mind & heart and empower those who feel they suffer for something they may see as a flaw.” The series makes people’s insecurities visible, as each individual has written them across their own bodies. The photos are raw, heartfelt visual diaries that are profoundly emotional…

View original post 166 more words

Let’s Judge Woody Allen — And His Golden Globes Tribute — By His Own Standards

Flavorwire

As you have perhaps heard, last night Ronan Farrow intervened in the matter of his (nominal) father’s career achievement Golden Globe by tweeting a single line:

View original post 673 more words